This is quite a statement.

Has anyone been to The Walkway over the Hudson lately? If you haven't been there in a year or two it has undergone some drastic changes. That part of the trail has gotten significantly better than what I remember.

The last time I took my parents to see The Walkway over the Hudson there was just a little shop on the Dutchess side. At least that's all I can recall that was there. Nothing really stood out to me.

When both my aunt and my grandma asked if they could see it during their recent visit I was hesitant. I told them that there wasn't much to see. We ended up goin anyway. Now there's nice benches, gazebos, bathrooms, visiting centers, vending machines and even bikes to rent. It sure has gone through a lot of changes.

They even have large pieces of art on the side of the trail now. One piece in particular really caught my eye.

I'll be honest. I don't have much of an eye for art but I can respect it and this sculpture was pretty easy to interpret.

The piece was made in 2015 and is called Suprina. Does it look familiar? If it doesn't you may have not been paying attention in science class. It's a DNA double helix. It's built from epoxy, steel and trash. The sign just below the totem states:

"Our DNA is similar to all other creatures that share our planet. Yet we are the only species that destroys our home here on earth - is it in our DNA to be so destructive to our own environment.

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