You probably never had to think about it, but if you need to prove that you live in New York State, for work or to get in-state tuition, what do you need to do to prove it? How do you go about proving it? Wild, right?

I never thought about it until my neighbor told me he was registering at a local college and even though he had lived in New York for four years, he had a few things to do to prove that he was a New York State resident, for at least the last 12-months.

Here are ways that you can prove it, should you ever need to, not just for New York, but these would pretty much work for any state in the nation:

  • As soon as you know that New York is going to be your home, grab some info and head to the Department of Motor Vehicles. Get yourself a New York Non-Driver ID or a Drivers License, and if you drive, register your car at the same time.
  • To prove that you have lived here, grab a piece of mail, or a pay-stub, make sure that there is an NYS address on both of these.
  • Use a utility bill as proof, which can be an issue if you rent a place with all utilities included.
  • Register to vote in the state.
  • At tax time, make sure to file New York State tax returns. You will need to know the date that you first moved to the state.
  • Open a bank account and use your New York address.
  • This step could be considered extreme, but buy a piece of property and make it your main residence.

Welcome to New York! It might take a few minutes to get you set up, but once you take care of a few things you can easily consider yourself a 'New Yorker.' Still looking for help, here are a few things I wish someone had told me before I moved to the area!

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